NAD Offering Free Upgrades To HDMI 2.0/HDCP 2.2 - Twice

NAD Offering Free Upgrades To HDMI 2.0/HDCP 2.2

Plug-in upgrade cards due for select AVRs and a pre-pro
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Pickering, Ontario – NAD will offer free HDMI 2.0 upgrade modules with HDCP 2.2  copy protection to purchasers of its modular T 777 and T 787 A/V receivers and to its T 187 preamp/surround processor.

Purchasers of the T758 AVR will be eligible for a $199 upgrade.

The plug-in modules will add the latest HDMI ins and outs with 4K copy protection to pass through 4K content from streaming services and from future 4K Blu-ray players to HDCP 2.2-equipped TVs.

Starting now, consumers buying the AVRs and preamp processor will get a certificate entitling them to a plug-in upgrade card. The certificates will be fulfilled through NAD dealers.

NAD expects to offer the upgrade module “later in 2015.” Its regular price will be a suggested $599 for previously purchased modular NAD AVRs and pre-pros going back to 2006.

The upgrade module will support 10.2Gbps HDMI 2.0, not 18Gbps HDMI 2.0, because "we don’t know of any 18Gbps parts available now," said Lenbrook/s Mark Stone. "Our best information is 2016 for these parts.  But we’ll definitely support HDCP 2.2."

HDMI 2.0 with 18Gbps speed adds support for 4K video at 50 and 60 fps, support for 8-bit RGB/YCbCr 4:4:4, 8/10/12-bit YCbCr 4:2:2, and 8-bit 4:2:0 mode, though 4:4:4 content doesn’t yet exist.

HDMI chipsets currently in the market offer HDMI 2.0/HDCP 2.2 up to 10-bit 4:2:2 4K 60P.

Since 2006, NAD has incorporated a modular design, called Modular Design Construction (MDC), into many AVRs and preamp/surround processors, placing all input/output circuitry on removable plug-in cards for upgrading.

MDC was designed to eliminate customer fears “about jumping on board too early” when considering an audio-equipment purchase, said Lenbrook America president Dean Miller. Many details of the 4K format “are not settled, and testing and compatibility between various components has not even begun,” the company noted.

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