Mitsubishi Outlines DLP, LCD Plans

By Greg Tarr On Apr 19 2010 - 4:01am




IRVINE, CALIF. — Mitsubishi Digital Electronics America (MDEA) is looking to capitalize on its early lead in 3D HDTV by rolling out its 2010 lineup of DLP rear-projection TVs with expanded 3D capability, as well as the expansion of the company’s signature Immersive Sound technology in both DLP and its first edge-lit LED LCD TVs.

Meanwhile, Frank DeMartin, MDEA marketing VP, told TWICE that the company remains committed to its Laservue laser-based DLP rear-projection technology and will have further announcements on the evolution of that system later this year.

The announced products shipping over “the next couple of months” include the 3D1 DLP rear-projection TVs that encompass seven models across three product series, and include the 60-inch, 65-inch, 73-inch and 82-inch screen sizes.

Select models take on the Immersive Sound direction started in the Unisen LCD TV line, by integrating 16-speaker 5.1-channel Dolby Digital surround sound. Also added is Internet media streaming capability.

The new Unisen Immersive Sound LCD TV lineup consists of four models across three product series, in the 46- and new 55-inch screen sizes. The 55- inch models replace the 52-inch models from a year ago. As well as Diamond series, Unisen models will see an expansion of the Immersive Sound system including 18 speakers, up from the traditional 16.

All 2010 LCD TVs feature LED edge lighting and will have either 16 or 18- speaker Immersive Sound packages. The technology produces a full surroundsound effect without using detached surround speaker placements.

A key new feature in many LCD and DLP models this year is called Stream- TV, which uses Vudu Apps technology to provide access to IPTV features with more than 100 different streaming applications — including extensive libraries of high-quality entertainment and socialmedia content, the company said. App service providers consist of Vudu movies, Pandora, Flickr, Picasa, Facebook, Twitter, the Associated Press and The New York Times, among others.

Key models also add integrated wireless Internet, which allows for seamless connectivity to wireless home networks, and Bluetooth audio streaming that wirelessly streams audio from any Bluetooth A2DP device (such as an iPod Touch/ iPhone or BlackBerry).

The new DLP rear-projection models represent the company’s fourth generation with 3D-ready capability, a feature that Mitsubishi first began showing in DLP sets in 2007.

Mitsubishi 3D TVs in the 738 and 838 series support a side-by-side 3D signal format, where past models supported the checkerboard 3D format used primarily by video games, DeMartin said. Legacy 3D-ready product and new 638 series models will require a 3D adapter to playback all three 3D signal format outlined in the HDMI 1.4a spec, including topbottom and frame packing used in new 3D Blu-ray Disc players. In all cases an emitter and matching 3D active-shutter glasses or DLP Link active-shutter glasses are required for 3D viewing.

“Products will ship initially supporting only the side-by-side 3D format internally, but we are planning to provide additional signal format upgrades to owners of those products by late summer of this year and update them to address all of the formats of the HDMI 1.4a spec,” DeMartin said.

DeMartin said MDEA stands by DLP rear-projection technology as 3D rolls out because it is optimized for large-screen displays, and 3D TV has proven to be a format best viewed on the largest screen possible.

New sets will include the 60-, 65-, 73- and 82-inch screen sizes, all offering more affordable prices than flat-panel technologies can approach.

This year, 738- and 838-series DLP TVs and all Unisen LCD models will include the aforementioned StreamTV feature. For the first time, Diamond 838 series DLP models will add the 16-speaker integrated Immersive Sound system that delivers a Dolby Digital 5.1 surround experience.

An additional new feature called Center Channel Mode in all the Immersive Sound TVs for the first time allows users to switch the speakers from surround sound to center channel-only speakers to better integrate with a full surround sound speaker system.

All 638-, 738- and Diamond 838-series 3D DLP Home Cinema TV models for 2010 include 3D DLP Link; modes such as brilliant, bright, natural and game; Plush 1080p; three HDMI with CEC remote- control system integration; HDMIPC compatibility; two component/composite video inputs; and MDEA’s 6-Color Processor that expands color reproduction beyond what is capable with most flat-panel TVs, the company said.

The entry 638 series features the 60- ($1,199 suggested retail), 65- ($1,499) and 73-inch ($1,999) screen sizes.

The step-up 738 series includes the 60-, 65- ($1,799), 73- ($2,399) and 82- inch ($3,799) screen sizes, all of which offer StreamTV Internet media, USB wireless-N network adapter compatibility, Plush 1080p 5G 12-bit video processor, Smooth120, EdgeEnhance, Deep- Field Imager, advanced video calibration and universal remote control.

The Diamond 838 series includes three 3D DLP Home Cinema TVs in the 65- ($2,199), 73- ($2,799) and 82-inch ($4,499) screen sizes. In addition to all features within the 638 and 738 series, each Diamond model includes 16-Speaker Immersive Sound with 32-watt total system power, Bluetooth A2DP audio streaming, center-channel mode, surround-channel outputs, subwoofer output, Dark Detailer, PerfectColor and PerfecTint.

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