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Onkyo Unveils THX Network A/V Receivers

Upper Saddle River, N.J. — Onkyo has unveiled two THX-certified network A/V receivers that feature 4K/60Hz and HDCP 2.2-compliant video and wireless high-res audio connectivity. 4/16/2014 10:45:00 AM Eastern

Upper Saddle River, N.J. — Onkyo has unveiled two THX-certified network A/V receivers that feature 4K/60Hz and HDCP 2.2-compliant video and wireless high-res audio connectivity.

The two receivers — the TX-NR737 and TX-NR838 — begin shipping in May with suggested retails of $899 and $1,199, respectively.

Onkyo’s said the three key features of the two new receivers are: sound quality for both multichannel and stereo listening; HDMI connectivity to enable Ultra HD video at 60 fps; and usability to make it easy to cue up content.

The new slogan for these two units is “Emotion Delivered,” which the company said expresses the “amplification philosophy.”

Both the TX-NR838 and TX-NR737 have Wide Range Amplifier Technology (WRAT), a system built around a custom high-output transformer, extra-large customized capacitors, and low-impedance copper bus-plates. Three-Stage Inverted Darlington Circuitry amplification features a discrete low-impedance output stage with high-current transistors for instantaneous power and extremely low distortion.

High-current power amplification combines with dual Digital Signal Processing (DSP) engines and 192 kHz/24-bit Burr-Brown D/A conversion, Onkyo said.

The TX-NR737 and TX-NR838 both feature proprietary AccuEQ room calibration that bypasses the front L/R channels so the loudspeakers’ audio characteristics are preserved. The remaining channels are “very quickly and easily optimized for balanced surround-sound performance,” the company said.

On the TX-NR838, users can select Pure Direct Analog Path mode to physically shut down all digital circuitry in the receiver, eliminating electrical interference. Signals pass directly from the phono or analog audio inputs to the amplifiers and arrive at the front loudspeakers in pristine analog form. The improvement in audio quality is significant, and helps to showcase the unique tonal character of vinyl, Onkyo said. Pure Direct Analog Path lets the TX-NR838 double as a pure-analog power amp for high-quality source components such as turntables, SACD players and Blu-ray players.

Both receivers feature seven HDMI inputs (six rear, one front with MHL) and two outputs, with inputs one through four and the front side input supporting Ultra HD video at 60 fps.

The TX-NR737 and TX-NR838 feature HDCP 2.2 compatibility on HDMI input 3 and Main Out, allowing the receiver to play copy-protected Ultra HD media and other premium streamed, broadcast, or physical video content. Home-theater receivers without HDCP 2.2 compatibility may only be able pass this premium content through to the display in standard definition (480i/576i).

Lower-definition video from legacy consoles, DVDs and streamed video via media player is converted to FullHD or 4K (depending on the display) with Qdeo up-scaling technology.

As well as powering audio in another room equipped with a pair of speakers, the TX-NR838 transmits high-definition video to a Zone 2 display via the HDMI Sub Out. Users can route 1080p content from media players connected to the receiver and enjoy it on a second display with smartphone control.

The additional HDMI output on the TX-NR737 is designed for projector connection. The TX-NR838 also features 7.2 multichannel pre-outs, five digital audio inputs, and a 12 -volt trigger-out for Zone 2 audio.

Built-in Wi-Fi and DLNA compatibility allows streaming of high-resolution music libraries from PC or media server, with search, track selection, and playback controls all enabled via the remote app. A variety of file formats are supported, including 5.6 MHz DSD, Dolby TrueHD, and gapless 192 kHz/24-bit FLAC and WAV.

Users can also stream music stored on handheld devices to these receivers via Wi-Fi, or use onboard Bluetooth 2.1+EDR.

Both receivers also provide access to an assortment of Internet services.